InfoGrid and Relational Databases

The other day I was asked:

Your pitch for InfoGrid really disses relational databases. But then, InfoGrid applications usually use MySQL (or PostgreSQL) to store their data. What gives?

To which I responded:

All the database vendors want you to store your data in their database, instead of files in the file system. But then, the databases themselves store their data as files in the file system. What gives?

This does not sound as contradictory. It’s fine that a database stores its data as files in a file system; it may or may not, as an application developer you really don’t care much. You care about the high-level facilities (such as SQL) that the database provides, because writing code against them is much easier and faster than writing against files (for many applications).

The InfoGrid argument is the same one, just one level up: It is much better the develop against the InfoGrid APIs than against SQL directly, because of all the high-level facilities that InfoGrid gives you. Here’s an example:

Try this with a relational database:

MeshObject employee = ...;
employee.bless( CustomerSubjectArea.CUSTOMER );

Your employee has just also become a customer, with all that this entails (e.g. participating in the relationship Customer_Places_Order, which you can’t as a mere employee). For more on blessing objects, see the documentation.

With raw SQL, you wouldn’t even know where exactly to start, but chances are you would have to redesign your schema, and write and update a whole lot of application code.

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